Safety / Survival / Army Field Manuals / AFM 3-05.70

Chapter 6

Water Procurement

Water is one of your most urgent needs in a survival situation. You can't live long without it, especially in hot areas where you lose water rapidly through perspiration. Even in cold areas, you need a minimum of 2 liters of water each day to maintain efficiency.

More than three-fourths of your body is composed of fluids. Your body loses fluid because of heat, cold, stress, and exertion. To function effectively, you must replace the fluid your body loses. So, one of your first goals is to obtain an adequate supply of water.

WATER SOURCES

6-1. Almost any environment has water present to some degree. Figure 6-1 lists possible sources of water in various environments. It also provides information on how to make the water potable.

NOTE: If you do not have a canteen, cup, can, or other type of container, improvise one from plastic or water-resistant cloth. Shape the plastic or cloth into a bowl by pleating it. Use pins or other suitable items—even your hands—to hold the pleats.

Figure 6-1. Water Sources in Different Environments

Figure 6-1. Water Sources in Different Environments

Figure 6-1. Water Sources in Different Environments (Continued)

Figure 6-1. Water Sources in Different Environments (Continued)

6-2. If you do not have a reliable source to replenish your water supply, stay alert for ways in which your environment can help you.

NOTE: DO NOT substitute the fluids listed in Figure 6-2 for water.

Figure 6-2. The Effects of Substitute Fluids

Figure 6-2. The Effects of Substitute Fluids

6-3. Heavy dew can provide water. Tie rags or tufts of fine grass around your ankles and walk through dew-covered grass before sunrise. As the rags or grass tufts absorb the dew, wring the water into a container. Repeat the process until you have a supply of water or until the dew is gone. Australian natives sometimes mop up as much as 1 liter an hour this way.

6-4. Bees or ants going into a hole in a tree may point to a water-filled hole. Siphon the water with plastic tubing or scoop it up with an improvised dipper. You can also stuff cloth in the hole to absorb the water and then wring it from the cloth.

6-5. Water sometimes gathers in tree crotches or rock crevices. Use the above procedures to get the water. In arid areas, bird droppings around a crack in the rocks may indicate water in or near the crack.

6-6. Green bamboo thickets are an excellent source of fresh water. Water from green bamboo is clear and odorless. To get the water, bend a green bamboo stalk, tie it down, and cut off the top (Figure 6-3). The water will drip freely during the night. Old, cracked bamboo may also contain water.

Figure 6-3. Water From Green Bamboo

Figure 6-3. Water From Green Bamboo

CAUTION

Purify the water before drinking it.

6-7. Wherever you find banana trees, plantain trees, or sugarcane, you can get water. Cut down the tree, leaving about a 30-centimeter (12-inch) stump, and scoop out the center of the stump so that the hollow is bowl-shaped. Water from the roots will immediately start to fill the hollow. The first three fillings of water will be bitter, but succeeding fillings will be palatable. The stump (Figure 6-4) will supply water for up to 4 days. Be sure to cover it to keep out insects.

Figure 6-4. Water From Plantain or Banana Tree Stump

Figure 6-4. Water From Plantain or Banana Tree Stump

6-8. Some tropical vines can give you water. Cut a notch in the vine as high as you can reach, then cut the vine off close to the ground. Catch the dropping liquid in a container or in your mouth (Figure 6-5).

CAUTION

Ensure that the vine is not poisonous.

Figure 6-5. Water From a Vine

Figure 6-5. Water From a Vine

6-9. The milk from young, green (unripe) coconuts is a good thirst quencher. However, the milk from mature, brown, coconuts contains an oil that acts as a laxative. Drink in moderation only.

CAUTION

Do not drink the liquid if it is sticky, milky, or bitter tasting.

6-10. In the American tropics you may find large trees whose branches support air plants. These air plants may hold a considerable amount of rainwater in their overlapping, thickly growing leaves. Strain the water through a cloth to remove insects and debris.

6-11. You can get water from plants with moist pulpy centers. Cut off a section of the plant and squeeze or smash the pulp so that the moisture runs out. Catch the liquid in a container.

6-12. Plant roots may provide water. Dig or pry the roots out of the ground, cut them into short pieces, and smash the pulp so that the moisture runs out. Catch the liquid in a container.

6-13. Fleshy leaves, stems, or stalks, such as bamboo, contain water. Cut or notch the stalks at the base of a joint to drain out the liquid.

6-14. The following trees can also provide water:

  • Palms. The buri, coconut, sugar, rattan, and nips contain liquid. Bruise a lower frond and pull it down so the tree will "bleed" at the injury.

  • Traveler's tree. Found in Madagascar, this tree has a cuplike sheath at the base of its leaves in which water collects.

  • Umbrella tree. The leaf bases and roots of this tree of western tropical Africa can provide water.

  • Baobab tree. This tree of the sandy plains of northern Australia and Africa collects water in its bottlelike trunk during the wet season. Frequently, you can find clear, fresh water in these trees after weeks of dry weather.

CAUTION

Do not keep the sap from plants longer than 24 hours. It begins fermenting, becoming dangerous as a water source.



previous | next

All text and images from the U.S. Army Field Manual 3-05.70: Survival.
Appearance of these materials here does not constitute or represent endorsement by mongabay.com.
Mongabay.com is not responsible for inaccurate or outdated information provided by the U.S. Army Field Manual 3-05.70.





Home
News
About
Contribute
Travel tips
  Travel Health Tips
  Health Conditions
  Kidnapping
  Kidnapping Stats
  Hijackings
  Culture Shock
  Hotel Crime
  Hotel Fires
  Civil Unrest
  Acts of Terror
  Important Papers
  Malaria
  Civil Unrest
  Airports
  Planes
  Public Transport
  Car Rentals
  Shark Attack Stats
Travel Photos
Rainforests
Tropical Fish
Travel Tips
Rainforest Tips
Books
Site Map
Copyright
Contact



what's new | for kids | rainforests | other languages | search | about | contact

Copyright Rhett Butler 2004-2017
mongabay.com is a free resource.